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Who can file a petition alleging forced labor and what is the standard of evidence required to show a violation of Section 307?

Anyone can file a petition – lawyers, advocates, organizations, or individuals. The evidence presented should reasonably, but not conclusively indicate that there is forced labor in the supply chain of the goods. However, in practice, stronger evidence (such as direct testimonies, copies of employment contracts, witness accounts based on on-site interviews) is recommended.

What should a petition under Section 307 contain?

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) administers the program.  CBP has rules that spell out petition requirements under 19 C.F.R. §12.42. There are three basic parts to the petition:

  • the overview statement;
  • the description of the goods; and
  • the statement of facts alleging forced labor in the production of the goods in the country of origin or processing and its link to U.S. imports.

 If you want to take action against forced labor in supply chains that export to the United States, please see our Practice Guide and our suggested Template for submissions to CBP under Section 307.

Practice Guide & Template

If you want to take action against forced labor in supply chains that export to the United States, please see the following resources created by the Human Trafficking Legal Center to assist you in submitting a petition to CBP under Section 307.

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